About ebiographer’s blog

byThis blog brings into present realities history and pictorial map of memories that are almost forgotten. Biographical sketches and historical background of African finest in business, politics, sport, education ,science and technology among many others. Adventure into fictional works of art is also something of interest ,including historical pictures and poems.

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2 thoughts on “About ebiographer’s blog”

  1. Great historical insights! I applaud your efforts to establish relevance and impacts of the legacies of great Nigerians, men and women of substance who have gone on to glory. By what you do, you do give credits when and where due, and at the same time ensure that the historical perspectives their legacies are preserved for generations yet unborn.
    It is in light of this that I am wondering if you would review all available historical records on Nigerian development and do a comprehensive piece on my father, the late Papa Joshua Anderson Ricketts of the reknown “Oko Ricketts,” meaning “Ricketts Boats” a water transportation business owner, located in Ebute Metta, Lagos.
    I am reasonably concerned that my father’s legacy may be forever lost in history if it is not well documented now before all those who may have primary knowledge of the events or stories pass on. However, if you choose to do the piece, which I’m sure your readers would find very interesting and inspiring, before publishing, family members, especially those who may want to collaborate, review or fact-check the documentary should be given opportunity to do that.
    My father founded a company called Ikosi Industries Ltd with some investing partners for his boating business, which was plying the waterways between Ebute Metta, Ebute Ero, Ikorodu, Epe, Ejinrin, Atijere and beyond, even as far as Okiti Pupa in those days when road transportation was scanty or totally absent in many areas of the Western Region.
    As far as I know, my father was an immigrant in Nigeria, originally from Jamaica and he eventually became naturalized as a Nigerian citizen. He came over to Nigeria with his Baptist missionary parents in his youth, together with six other siblings after a brief stay in Congo. They settled and made their homes in rural Agbowa Ikosi, close to the lagoon in Epe division of Lagos State, where their father started a Baptist Mission House and engaged in subsistent farming.
    My father got the idea of boat building from the engineering skills he learned working in the Nigerian Railways Corporation, and he aimed to satisfy the great transportation needs of traders in those days, to get their wares to the various markets.
    He went on to start a Modern School in Agbowa Ikosi to educate the local children, emphasizing technical skills, and he contributed tirelessly in various capacities to uplift the society as a whole into a modern civilization. He was appreciated and honored with the title “Asiwaju of Agbowa.”
    Apart from being a great industrialist employing hundreds of people, (in those days, he would personally loan other struggling businesses money to operate,) he was also a great philanthropist, donating his resources for progressive causes, especially towards building schools and education future leaders.
    He was also a great family man who loved and cared for his family and friends, He was survived by 25 children when he rested in the Lord at the age of 92 in 1976.
    Dr Tai Solarin is another icon that his story needs to be told!
    Thank you.

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    1. Dear Dr Becky, nee Ricketts, we would like to cover Mr. Ricketts’ story in our next edition. Kindly advice on how to get information on this great man.
      Regards, Ebiographer.

      Like

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